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Getting males from a hermaphrodite population. This is a modified version of protocol originally written by Michael Koelle at Yale University.

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[Bio101] Making Males of C. elegans

Developmental Biology > Cell growth and fate

[Abstract] Getting males from a hermaphrodite population. This is a modified version of protocol originally written by Michael Koelle at Yale University.

Materials and Reagents

  1. NGM plates

Equipment

  1. 25 and 30 °C incubators

Procedure

  1. Set up ~6 NGM plates (seeded with normal bacterial food E. coli OP50-1) with 10 L4 hermaphrodites each.
  2. Heat shock 4-6 h (no more than 6 h) at 30 °C.
  3. Move plates to 25 °C. You should get a few males per plate in the F1 generation.
    Note: To get more males, it is best to set them up with an excess of L4 hermaphrodites to ensure more males recover in the next generation.
  4. Male stocks should be maintained by selecting out an excess of males, along with a few L4 hermaphrodites in each generation (usually, male to hermaphrodite ratio is about 1: 10).


How to cite this protocol: He, F. (2011). Making Males of C. elegans. Bio-protocol Bio101: e58. DOI: 10.21769/BioProtoc.58; Full Text



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11/7/2012 8:25:19 AM  

I wasn't sure about this thank you!

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3/16/2012 10:24:22 PM  

Thanks for contributing. It's helped me undersantd the issues.

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Please login to post your questions/comments. Your questions will be directed to the authors of the protocol. The authors will be requested to answer your questions at their earliest convenience. Once your questions are answered, you will be informed using the email address that you register with bio-protocol.
You are highly recommended to post your data (images or even videos) for the troubleshooting. For uploading videos, you may need a Google account because Bio-protocol uses YouTube to host videos.

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