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Vivian Siegel

Education

Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco, USA

Current position

Director of Education and Training, The Global Biological Standards Institute (11/2014-present)
Adjunct Research Professor of Medicine, Vanderbilt University (01/2012-present)
Visiting Instructor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) (08/2015-present)

Currently an educator, coach, and consultant, Dr. Siegel has a keen interest in research reproducibility. In her work with GBSI, she develops new curricula aimed at improving data reproducibility, and views accurate reporting of research protocols as critical to this goal. She also regularly teaches scientific communication as well as authorship and peer review ethics at research universities around the world.
Dr. Siegel has accumulated decades of experience in scientific publishing. She joined the staff of Cell as senior editor in 1994, and succeeded Benjamin Lewin as editor-in-chief in 1999. While at Cell Press, she helped launch Molecular Cell, Developmental Cell, and Cancer Cell, and served as the editor-in-chief of Cell, Molecular Cell, and Developmental Cell (all at the same time). She left Cell Press to lead Public Library of Science as its founding Executive Director and one of the launch editors of PLoS Biology. In addition, she was also involved in the launches of many other leading scientific journals including PLoS Medicine, the PLoS Community journals, and Disease Models and Mechanisms.

Publications

  1. Bartolomucci, A., Parmigiani, S., Rodgers, R. J., Vidal-Puig, A., Allan, S. E. and Siegel, V. (2012). The Obese Species: a special issue on obesity and metabolic disorders. Foreword. Dis Model Mech 5(5): 563-564.
  2. Moore, J. L., Neilson, E. G., Siegel, V. and Associate Editors at Journal of American Society of, N. (2011). Effect of recommendations from reviewers suggested or excluded by authors. J Am Soc Nephrol 22(9): 1598-1602.
  3. Siegel, V. (2011). Reproducibility in research. Dis Model Mech 4(3): 279-280.
  4. Patil, C. and Siegel, V. (2009). Shining a light on dark data. Dis Model Mech 2(11-12): 521-525.
  5. Siegel, V. (2009). Resources, repositories and rewards. Dis Model Mech 2(9-10): 423-425.
  6. Patil, C. and Siegel, V. (2009). This revolution will be digitized: online tools for radical collaboration. Dis Model Mech 2(5-6): 201-205.
  7. Patil, C. and Siegel, V. (2009). Shining a light on dark data. Dis Model Mech 2(11-12): 521-525.
  8. Siegel, V. (2009). Resources, repositories and rewards. Dis Model Mech 2(9-10): 423-425. 
  9. Patil, C. and Siegel, V. (2009). This revolution will be digitized: online tools for radical collaboration. Dis Model Mech 2(5-6): 201-205.
  10. Patil, C. and Siegel, V. (2009). Drinking from the firehose of scientific publishing. Dis Model Mech 2(3-4): 100-102.
  11. Siegel, V. (2009). Courting change. Dis Model Mech 2(3-4): 97-99.
  12. Siegel, V. (2009). I kid you not. Dis Model Mech 2(1-2): 5-6.
  13. Siegel, V. (2008). Where credit is due. Dis Model Mech 1(4-5): 187-191. 
  14. Siegel, V. (2008). Provoking progress. Dis Model Mech 1:3-5.
  15. Siegel, V. (2008). The promise of peer review. Dis Model Mech 1(2-3): 73-77.
  16. Neilson, E. G., Siegel, V., Harris, R. C. (2007). JASN begins anew. J Am Soc Nephrol 18(7): 1987. 
  17. Siegel, V. (2005). Strategies for the shy. ASCB Newsletter 28(11): 14-15.
  18. Siegel, V. (2004). The desire to do something good. Biotechniques 37(1): 17.
  19. Siegel, V. (2004). Open-access publishing. Lancet 364(9428): 25.
  20. Siegel, V. (2004). Points of view: should students be encouraged to publish their research in student-run publications?: Weighing the pros and cons of undergraduate-only journal publications. Cell Biol Educ 3(1): 26-27.
  21. Bernstein, P., Cohen, B., MacCallum, C., Parthasarathy, H., Patterson, M. and Siegel, V. (2003). PLoS biology--we're open. PLoS Biol 1(1): E34.
  22. Siegel, V. and Sweet, D. (2001). Where Cell Biology and Developmental Biology Meet. Dev Cell 1(1): 1.
  23. Siegel, V. (1997). Recognition of a transmembrane domain: another role for the ribosome? Cell 90(1): 5-8. 
  24. Siegel, V. (1995). A second signal recognition event required for translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum. Cell 82(2): 167-170.
  25. Weber, U., Siegel, V. and Mlodzik, M. (1995). Pipsqueak encodes a novel nuclear protein required downstream of seven-up for the development of photoreceptors R3 and R4. EMBO J 14(24): 6247-6257.
  26. Siegel, V., Jongens, T. A., Jan, L. Y. and Jan, Y. N. (1993). Pipsqueak, an early acting member of the posterior group of genes, affects vasa level and germ cell-somatic cell interaction in the developing egg chamber. Development 119(4): 1187-1202.
  27. Brennwald, P. J., Siegel, V., Walter, P. and Wise, J. A. (1991). Sequence and structure of Tetrahymena SRP RNA. Nucleic Acids Res 19(8): 1942.
  28. Driever, W., Siegel, V. and Nusslein-Volhard, C. (1990). Autonomous determination of anterior structures in the early Drosophila embryo by the bicoid morphogen. Development 109(4): 811-820.
  29. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1989). Assembly of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1(4): 635-638.
  30. Poritz, M. A., Siegel, V., Hansen, W. and Walter, P. (1988). Small ribonucleoproteins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Yarrowia lipolytica homologous to signal recognition particle. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 85(12): 4315-4319.
  31. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1988). Each of the activities of signal recognition particle (SRP) is contained within a distinct domain: analysis of biochemical mutants of SRP. Cell 52(1): 39-49.
  32. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1988). Binding sites of the 19-kDa and 68/72-kDa signal recognition particle (SRP) proteins on SRP RNA as determined in protein-RNA "footprinting". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 85(6): 1801-1805. 
  33. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1988). The affinity of signal recognition particle for presecretory proteins is dependent on nascent chain length. EMBO J 7(6): 1769-1775.
  34. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1988). Functional dissection of the signal recognition particle. Trends Biochem Sci 13(8): 314-316. 
  35. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1986). Removal of the Alu structural domain from signal recognition particle leaves its protein translocation activity intact. Nature 320(6057): 81-84.
  36. Siegel, V., Hansen, W. and Garcia, P. (1986). Elongation control by signal recognition particle. Translational Control 158-161. 
  37. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1986). Structure and function of the signal recognition particle. Genetic Engineering: Principles and methods 8, 181-196.
  38. Walter, P., Siegel, V., Lauffer, L. and Garcia, P. D. (1986). The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum-The signal hypothesis ten years later. Protein Compartmentalization, 1-13.
  39. Siegel, V. and Walter, P. (1985). Elongation arrest is not a prerequisite for secretory protein translocation across the microsomal membrane. J Cell Biol 100(6): 1913-1921.
  40. Walter, P., Siegel, V., Lauffer, L., Garcia, P. D., Ullrich, A. and Harkins, R. (1985). Targeting of nascent secretory proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. Transport and Secretion of Proteins 21-23.